BoG published its November 2015 balance sheet data which makes it a good opportunity to look into recent developments.

BoG - Balance Sheet - Jan - Noc 2015

Compared to the peak during June, liabilities towards the Eurosystem (Target2 + extra banknotes) have decreased substantially from €130.5bn (more than 70% of Greek GDP) to €117.8bn which is still a very high number. Almost all of the fall was driven by the €10.5bn reduction in Target2 liabilities.

This improvement of BoG’s net liability position was reflected on bank borrowing which fell from €126.2bn to €113.4bn. Most of the change is attributed to lower ELA which is down €9.3bn but still stands at May levels.

An interesting side effect of large ELA bank borrowing is the fact that BoG earns around €100mn monthly from the (assumed) 150bps spread over the MRO rate. As a result it has already accumulated profits probably close to €1bn from these operations. These profits will clearly prove quite helpful for the 2016 budget execution although they represent a ‘windfall flow of income’.

Lower loans from the BoG mean that banks can free up a part of the collateral they have been posting to the central bank with total collateral being almost €14bn lower than its peak during the summer. Given the fact that Greek banks already have €10bn less assets than during January while NPLs are still on an upward path this development is more than welcome. Especially since the total of debt securities and credit claims (before provisions) on their balance sheet is only a total of €288bn. Taking into account NPLs it is evident that Greek banks were already very thin in available collateral during the heated summer standoff between Greece and its creditors.

Lastly, one other positive news item is the fact that the government account at the BoG now holds more than €5bn. Since for the next months the remaining Greek debt obligations are quite contained it stands clear that the Greek government has some leeway to not try and conclude the first quarter negotiations (which contain some of the most difficult parts of the package such as pension reforms) without giving a fight. Specifically, it has to pay €1.2bn to the IMF in December and €1.4bn during the first quarter.